Press

Above the Law

October 6, 2017

“We can’t wait for permission or an invitation because chances are, they ain’t coming. We have to just make the art and put it out there. It involves risk. It involves money. And trust me, it also involves managing a lot of self-doubt, fear, and Imposter Syndrome. But in the end, if we’re about the hashtag #RepresentationMatters, then we have to take some risks. We can no longer stay invisible.”
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Central Texas Live Theatre

March 12, 2017

“A Girl Named Sue is an innocuous, almost innocent, title for a powerful and hardhitting stage presentation. A Girl Named Sue is must-see theatre that has healing power.”
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The Austin Chronicle

March 10, 2017

“It’s a story about letting go of what the world thinks you should be, embracing yourself, and going for it. And that’s as American as it gets.”
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Broadway World

March 10, 2017

“There is a lot of original theatre that happens here in Austin and it spans the gamut in terms of quality. A GIRL NAMED SUE, a new play by Christine Hoang, now in its World Premiere production in the Trinity Street Theatre, is among the best this town has to offer, both in terms of quality and in execution. Ms. Hoang has crafted a funny, witty and touching play that examines inter-cultural as well as interracial relationships all set in the world of coffee house collegiate culture. It manages to deliver a powerful message without ever being high handed or preachy. It does what all good theatre must do first and foremost: entertain.”
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Austin-American Statesman (Austin360)

March 6, 2017

“‘A Girl Named Sue’ is a witty, self-aware, thoughtful new play that provides a vital, but warm, perspective on one of the most difficult issues of our time — what it means to be a person of color, and especially a woman of color, in America.”
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KUT 90.5, Austin’s NPR Station, Arts Eclectic

February 13, 2017

BettySoo was a little surprised to find herself serving as Hoang’s muse. “I was like ‘Really? My songs moved you like that?’” she says. Though she was surprised, she was also eager to participate in Hoang’s vision. “Christine’s such a visionary,” says BettySoo. “And she’s the rare visionary who can actually get things done… so I was really honored.”
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Texas Bar Journal

March 16, 2016

“Two Fathers: The Vietnam Vet and the Vietnamese Refugee was chosen as one of the Best of Fest for FronteraFest 2016. Hoang, an attorney, wrote the script at night at her kitchen table, and Hughes helped research and agreed to recite his lines onstage. Two Fathers is the second piece by Color Arc Productions, which Hoang founded in 2015 to promote diverse stories through the arts. Its first, People of Color Christmas: The White Elephant in the Room—which she wrote, produced, acted in, and directed—received positive critical reviews and audience feedback.”
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The Austin Chronicle

December 18, 2015

“”Hoang has tapped that feeling for her holiday comedy, which presents characters who, she says, “were all teased as kids, and as adults still experience things that make us feel that we don’t fit into the mainstream. But we misfit toys found each other.”
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Ann Pittman

December 16, 2015

People of Color Christmas: the White Elephant In the Room.
The title alone is amazing.
And it’s amazing that this was accomplished through the vision of what I can only imagine is one woman (Christine Hoang) inspired by a lot of other people (of color).
So this Christmas if you’re just a little tired of the same old trail of lights, carol singers at the Domain, and Christmas shows performing on repeat at theatres this time of year… buy a (cheap) ticket to POC Christmas at Ground Floor theatre.
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